Car Monopoly 2

Bankrupt Your Family & Friends With These Top 10 Car-Themed Monopoly Games

You might not be able to hit 200 mph racing around a car-themed Monopoly board, but you’ll still get that adrenaline rush when you force your family into bankruptcy during a “friendly” game over the holidays. Monopoly, the game of acquisition and shady negotiation practices (there’s one in every family), has dozens of special editions, but these car-themed ones will delight enthusiasts of all ages.

Affiliate Disclosure: Automoblog and its partners may be compensated when you purchase the products below.

Ranging from NASCAR to old school classics, it’s pretty cool what happens when automotive culture meets this family-favorite real estate game. We couldn’t rank them in any particular order, but we’ll walk you through the list so you can find your personal favorite.

#1: NASCAR Collector’s Edition

There are a few NASCAR Monopoly editions to choose from. Dale Earnhardt has his own edition where you purchase his race cars, and the “My Fantasy Edition” allows you to choose where the drivers go, peeling and placing the labels where you want. (The driver labels are static cling, for anyone curious like me). In contrast, while playing Monopoly NASCAR Collector’s Edition, you and your opponents race around the board to acquire both car and driver teams instead of properties. Of all the NASCAR editions, this one is our favorite.

Since the game was made a while ago, it won’t include newer faces like Ryan Blaney, Clint Bowyer, or Austin Dillon, but NASCAR fixtures like Dale Jr., Rusty Wallace, Bill Elliott, and Jeff Gordon are still up for grabs.

In terms of artistry, the Collector’s Edition ranks high with its neon colors and the graphic in the middle of Tony Stewart and Jeff Gordon racing to the finish line. Designed by Sam Bass – the artist who worked on creating car designs like the “Rainbow Warrior” – the color and beautiful representation of NASCAR aren’t surprising on this game board. He also had a hand in shaping the pewter pieces, not forgetting to include things you see at every NASCAR race, like the small figurine waving the checkered flag or the semi-trucks you usually see parked in the middle of the track.

Where to Buy: You can grab one of these NASCAR special editions, both new and used, on Amazon.   

#2: Mustang 40th Anniversary Edition

Monopoly has been strictly forbidden at my house during the holidays (not my fault people can’t buy the right properties), but I might be able to get my classic-car lover dad to reinstate it with this edition. Players take a spin around the board with game pieces unique to this set – a pewter tire, front grille, the running Mustang logo, and the choice between a Mustang convertible or a sedan.

In order to gain control of the board, players can buy, sell, or trade Mustang models like the original 1964 that debuted at the World’s Fair. This Monopoly board celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Mustang in 2004, so it won’t include the 5th or 6th generation Mustangs. The 2004 version of the famous pony car was the last of the “New Edge” models before Ford restyled the Mustang in 2005. 

Where to Buy: The Mustang 40th Anniversary Collector’s Edition is an ideal gift if you have a Mustang fan on your holiday shopping list. It’s available on Amazon for $118.85.

#3: Classic Volkswagen Monopoly

In this reimagined version of Monopoly, players trade VW money to collect vintage makes and models that replace the board’s properties (you can lay claim to the classic VW Fastback in place of Boardwalk, for example). Carports and garages replace houses and hotels so players can still collect that extra “rent” when opponents land on their car title.

If you land on the wash bay, be prepared to shell out $100, not to mention the $200 for vehicle registration. It makes me wonder if the DMV would be interested in partnering with Monopoly to make their own version of the game!

Where to Buy: This one might be harder to come by, but we recommend checking out the VW Monopoly page on BoardGameGeek periodically. At the time of this writing, there were no copies available for sale. 

#4: Corvette 50th Anniversary Edition

Maybe you can’t afford them in real life, but in Corvette Monopoly, you can own an original 1953 model, a vintage shark coupe, and a classic stingray all at the same time. Of course, that’s only if you have keen financial skills. Classic Corvettes take the board in place of properties while players navigate to dominate the entire collection of cars.

The design makes it clear this is an anniversary edition, keeping the classic, almost vintage look of Monopoly but giving it darker, more maroon accents to set it apart.

Where to Buy: The Corvette 50th Anniversary Collector’s Edition of Monopoly is available on Amazon for $83. 

#5: Ford 100th Anniversary Collector’s Edition

While there are other variations of Ford Monopoly, the 100th Anniversary Collector’s Edition goes back to 1903 with the Ford Model A and other notable classics like the 1949 Ford Custom Convertible. It’s not all about cars in this version, though. Players can purchase powertrains like the flathead V8 in their bid to win the board.

Everyone knows a Ford fan, so this might make an excellent gift to pass the time in Christmas Quarantine 2020.

Where to Buy: The Ford 100th Anniversary Collector’s Edition is priced a little higher than some others on this list. It’s currently available on Amazon for $167.   

#6: Monopoly Cars 2 Race Track

Monopoly Cars 2 Race Track

For kids who are more into Lightning McQueen than Chevys and Fords, Cars 2 Monopoly will be an absolute blast! Unlike the other editions, this Monopoly board is a perfect circle and is a true race track. The game is modified to keep children engaged, and the starting recommended player age is lowered to five. Instead of rolling dice, kids give Lightning McQueen a push to see what number he lands on and how many spaces they get to move.

True to form, the properties are replaced with familiar Cars characters like the lovable tow truck, Mater, or secret agent Holley Shiftwell. Your kids might be too young to drive, but they can experience the excitement of being first-time car owners while they try to leave their friends in the dust. 

Where to Buy: This kid-friendly version of Monopoly is available on Amazon for $39.95.

#7: Monopoly Gamer Mario Kart

Nintendo paired up with Monopoly to turn out a Mario Kart edition for the Gamer series, which features popular Super Mario characters. Now you can crush your opponents by buying properties – but Mario Kart style. Instead of avoiding the lava in Bowser’s Castle or sliding off Rainbow Road into oblivion, you can buy those and other tracks with coins in place of Monopoly’s usual properties and paper cash.

You can pick between Mario, Princess Peach, Luigi, and Toad. Each are tucked in their color-coordinated race cars and ready to toss some shells. Just like those Mario Kart marathons in college when you should have been studying, playing the Monopoly version also means avoiding banana peels!

Where to Buy: The Mario Kart edition of Monopoly is available on Amazon from $44.95 and up. 

#8: Nürburgring Edition

The merciless track where automakers push their vehicles to the limits is now available for your kitchen table. You can own pieces of the “Green Hell” that many a performance car has sunk its teeth into like the Schwedenkreuz (Swedish Cross) or Galgenkof curves. You have to pay up when you land on the Nordschleife Zufahrt (The North Loop Driveway), but there are cool pieces to move around the board, like a tire, a helmet, or an F1 car.

Keep Google translate handy and use it to learn a new language (Eine neue Sprache lernen) because this version of Monopoly is in German (Beeindruckend!). The go-to jail square is still the same, if not written in German.

Where to Buy: It’s a reasonable $60 from the Nürburgring shop.

#9: Shinola Detroit Edition Monopoly 

Based in the automotive strong-arm of Detroit, Shinola’s Monopoly game pays homage to its hometown. The pieces, which have a more antiqued look to them, symbolize the Motor City’s culture. Game pieces include a record player, pocket watch, Yorkie, piggy bank, handheld iron, and a car that looks like a tiny vintage Maserati ready to speed around the board.  

Riddled with references to Detroit, like Boardwalk and Park Place being replaced with Woodward and Jefferson avenues, we can’t help but rank it among our favorites. The only inaccuracy on this board is that car insurance is just $75 – what a dream to pay only that much for insurance in Michigan!

Where to Buy: This special Monopoly edition is available through the Shinola Detroit website for $395. This is the most expensive game on our list, but it’s also one of the nicest. The money and pieces are stored under the board, which is made from black lacquered solid mahogany.

#10: Snap-On Tools Collector’s Edition

Mechanics, the ones enamored with the insides of a car just as much as the shiny exterior, might be excited to compete in the Snap-on Tools version of Monopoly. To navigate the board and “fix” your way to victory, you choose your favorite tool like that signature Snap-on socket that gave the 1920s company their jump start. Wrenches, sanders, and drills are just a few of the tools that inspire the properties you collect in your bid to own every spot on the board.

It might get tense when you land on the money-guzzling vintage van that demands you pay up $200 or when you get caught by the $75 towing service square. However, no one is better at figuring out tough problems than mechanics!

Where to Buy: As of this writing, it’s about $140 on Amazon. Sure, you have to shell out a few bucks to get this Monopoly board, but it might be worth it to pry the gearhead in your life away from the garage for a few hours.  

Emily Pruitt is fascinated by the current changes in the automotive industry, from electric cars and infrastructure to fully autonomous vehicles. Outside of the automotive world, she can be found writing poetry or unraveling the latest mystery novel.

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