Covini C3A Supercar Sports a Six Pack of Tires

Through over 100 years of automobile development, the motoring world has adjusted to a gradual but significant advancement for how we commute. Increases in engine efficiency, bodies reshaped with lighter but stronger materials and the most recent mass integration of computer controls have largely gone as accepted changes resulting in the 21st century automobiles we drive today. Despite all the adjustment made in the progression to the modern automobile, one near constant remained is the presence of four wheels.

Breaking conventions of four wheels, Italy’s Genius Car Limited is taking another step towards supercar distinction with six-wheels. First developing the C6W prototype in 2008, Genius Car refined their vastly original creation with the Covini C3A. A recent participant in the recently Goodwood Festival of Speed, the Covini C3A stunned the British crowd with four wheels ahead of the driver‘s compartment. Wearing 15-inch wheels on the front wheels and 20-inch wheels on the rear, the Covini C3A succeeds as a true attention-getter covered by a shapely carbon fiber body.

The Covini C3A is not the first time a six-wheeled automobile was favoured in a performance application. Resembling the layout seen on today’s dually pickup trucks, a late 1930s Auto Union hill climb car employed four wheels on the drive axle. Seeing a competitive advantage of four smaller tires on the front, the Tyrrell Formula 1 racing team introduced the six-wheeled P-34 chassis for the 1976 season. Taking advantage of a Formula 1 technical rulebook that was considerably thinner than today’s tight governing, the Tyrrell P34 initially experienced success with driver Jody Scheckter winning the Swedish Grand Prix behind the wheel. However, Tyrrell continuation with the unusual six-wheeler for two grand prix seasons ended with the P34 principles being abandoned. While other Formula 1 teams expressed interest in the six-wheel race car philosophy through their own experiments, the world racing sanctioning body eventually specified vehicles can only have four wheels.

On the Covini C3A, Genius Car attests the six-wheel supercar concept provides several street-worthy qualities placing the vehicle ahead of traditional four-wheeled rivals. Providing better traction with increased road contact, the six wheels of the Covini C3A vows increased grip and improved handling. The six wheels applied to the road are also effective in more aggressive braking performance. Brembo vented brakes assure the Covini C3A delivers constantly strong stopping power. On a race track, the provision of four wheels at the front allows for later braking as well as higher turning speeds. Finally yet importantly, Genius Car Limited says the six-wheel layout provides a most comfortable ride as suspension movement is distributed broadly for lesser travel.

 

 

Powered by a 4.2 liter engine V-8 sourced from Audi, the Covini C3A’s performance output is estimated at 434 horsepower. Sent through the rear wheels, the powerplant is guided through a six-speed manual transmission. When it comes to overall performance, the Covini C3A offers a quoted top speed of 300 kilometers per hour (186 miles per hour).

Underneath the carbon fiber shell, the Covini C3A is framed with tubular steel. Overall, the vehicle weighs a stout 1,150 kilograms (2,535.3 pounds) which includes a high-tech interior. With a special Apple iPhone app, the Covini C3A vital controls such as door locks, alarm and more advanced properties can be adjusted remotely.

Planning to be able to produce the Covini C3A in limited quantities, the six-wheeled supercar is one of those vehicles ideal for the individual wanting to prove that the status quo is something money and taste can override.

Information and photo source: Genius Car Limited

 

Chris Nagy

Chris Nagy

Automotive Editor
Admiring automobiles ever since childhood viewership of the TV show Knight Rider, Chris Nagy grew as an enthusiast enroute to become an automotive and motorsport writer. Drawn to the rich world of motoring, Chris discovers charm everywhere in the industry from supercars like the Bugatti Veyron to a Kia Soul. Car design, engineering, performance and the passion itself fuels his daily existence.
Chris Nagy

@ChrisnagyCarGuy

Mech Eng. Grad, Automotive & Motorsport Journalist with a wide range of intrigue. An Unsuccessful Quitter Who Continues to Try.
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Filed Under: AudiCar DesignCar NewsCovini EngineeringGoodwood Festival of Speed


  • http://www.audipage.com Audipage

    The 5.2L engine of R8 could have been suited more in this car.