edo competition Creates Dark Edition on BMW M5 Touring

Fans of the Bavarian auto company are currently celebrating the latest M iteration of the 5 Series on BMW’s F10 platform. Producing more factory horses than ever seen prior on the M5, the 560-horsepower BMW has improved engine output with a more compact powerplant. Dropping in a special TwinPower 4.4 liter, V-8 engine, BMW has set aside the once-mighty V-10 that delivered raw horsepower as a normally aspirated power unit. Though there will definitely be seekers to the newer, more efficient twin-turbocharged engine, favourites could be played for the now obsolete BMW M5 by cylinder counting enthusiasts.

As the BMW factory has upped the game for the new M5, influences outside of the Stuttgart will be giving the V-10 engined E60-type M5 another hurrah. Created out of the BMW M5 Touring (an estate wagon having never crossed the Atlantic Ocean from Europe), Germany’s edo competition brought light to the 2005 to 2010 model car with a host of modifications. Through a shining performance machine, edo competition defines their newest tuner vehicle as the BMW M5 Dark Edition.

Coated with a stunning but sinister black paint, edo competition accessorized the former M5 Touring’s exterior with a unique front and rear valance. On the wagon’s tailgate, a rear wing has been mounted along roof height. Completing the mysterious look, the BMW M5 Dark Edition receives black-painted 20-inch light alloy wheels.

Bringing the V-10 powerplant almost up to the 2012 BMW M5’s performance level, edo competition has rigged the BMW M5 Dark Edition with 555 horsepower. Only 5 horses shy of tying the new BMW car, the BMW M5 Dark Edition is 55 horsepower above the factory preparation of the 5-liter V-10 engine. Accompanied with 413 pounds-feet of torque, the V-10 engine’s newfound power boost comes from a recalibrated engine ECU, high-flow air filters and a performance exhaust system. With four chrome pipes accented by the rear skirt, the BMW M5 Dark Edition’s exhaust is funnelled out in aggression.

Translating the 555 horsepower generated from the V-10 engine, the edo competition’s BMW M5 Dark Edition track performance is sent through rear wheel drive. Rolling the 20-inch wheels on Dunlop tires, the 0 to 62 mile per hour acceleration times for the M5 Dark Edition is accomplished in 5 seconds flat. Half a second faster than the stock BMW M5, the edo competition-prepared Dark Edition is 5 seconds faster compared to the factory BMW accelerating from 62 to 124 miles per hour. Another electronic modification to the performance of the BMW M5 Dark Edition has the removal of the factory’s top speed limiter. Now completely unleashed, the edo competition-tuned, V-10 powered BMW M5 can storm up to 190 miles per hour

Already presented with a most suitable interior provided through the BMW M range, edo competition has used the finest carbon fiber and leather materials to make their Dark Edition a cut above the factory car. Within the dash cluster, a 360 kilometer per hour (223.7 mile per hour) speedometer is worn among some special edo competition guages. Unlike most tuner cars, 5 passengers and loads of cargo capacity is a touch the BMW M5 Dark Edition buyers could use to persuade their practical mindedness.

Fulfilling their vehicle orders in an Ahlen, Germany facility, the BMW M5 Dark Edition is only the latest project undertaken by edo competition Motorsport GmbH. Some of the tuner company’s most recent vehicle modifications took place on the Lamborghini Murciélago (the edo competition LP750) and the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren (called the SLR Black Arrow). As a performance house, edo competition equally considers out of production vehicles such as the Ferrari Enzo and the Ford GT for recent modifications, infusing new life in vehicles that once modeled for car magazine cover.

A hot rod grocery-getter, the edo competition BMW M5 could also present a minor annoyance when police radar guns will be fixed on the vehicle’s travels.

Information and photo source: edo competition Motorsport GmbH

Chris Nagy

Chris Nagy

Automotive Editor
Admiring automobiles ever since childhood viewership of the TV show Knight Rider, Chris Nagy grew as an enthusiast enroute to become an automotive and motorsport writer. Drawn to the rich world of motoring, Chris discovers charm everywhere in the industry from supercars like the Bugatti Veyron to a Kia Soul. Car design, engineering, performance and the passion itself fuels his daily existence.
Chris Nagy

@ChrisnagyCarGuy

Mech Eng. Grad, Automotive & Motorsport Journalist with a wide range of intrigue. An Unsuccessful Quitter Who Continues to Try.
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