Kyleigh’s Law Now Official in New Jersey

In a law that seems to be inspired by those moronic and self-centered “baby on board” stickers, the state of New Jersey (The Garden State!) as decided to implement a new law that requires drivers under the age of 21 to attach red stickers on their front and rear license plates. It’s called Kyleigh’s Law because a teenage driver, by the name of Kyleigh, was killed by another teenage driver while operating a motor vehicle.

The new law in New Jersey (The Garden State!) requires that a red sticker needs to be placed in the upper left hand corner of the license plate while the teenage driver is driving. Naturally, the red sticker of shame and infamy can be removed when an older, assumedly safer, person is driving. The red sticker can be transferred to another car that the untrustworthy teenage driver might be operating.

Attorney Gregg Trautmann said that the red sticker is equivalent to tagging teenagers with a scarlet letter for age discrimination and can make them a target for police and sex offenders. And Raymond Martinez, the guy in charge of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission, called the law “one of the most significant steps forward in teen driver safety.”

Ray didn’t elaborate on just HOW this was going to make things “safer”, but I will give him an award for making a statement even more pandering and fear mongering than Trautmann’s.

Naturally, the red stickers of shame and infamy will not come free to the teens required to use them. They can be purchased at motor vehicle agencies and cost $4.00, with sales beginning in April of 2010. The new law will take effect on May 1, 2010.

So what happens if you take the sticker off, or it falls off or some such other scenario happens? That will cost you $100.00 if you get caught.

Source: Top Speed

About The Author

Tony Borroz grew up in a sportscar oriented family, but sadly, it was British cars. His knuckles still show the marks of slipped Whitworth sockets, strains to reach rear upper shock bushings on Triumphs and slight burn marks from dealing with Lucas Electric "systems". He has written for a variety of car magazines and websites, Automoblog chief among them, as well as working on very popular driving games as a content expert. He has also worked for aerospace companies, software giants and as a movie stuntman. He currently lives in a secure, undisclosed location in the American southwestern desert.

3 Comments on "Kyleigh’s Law Now Official in New Jersey"

  1. Karen Purkins

    I think it is an absolute JOKE! Yes your daughter died but my daughter has to be profiled now and possibly stalked by a child predator because she has to have a stupid red sticker on the front and back of our family car. I will say it right here and now if something happens to my daughter, because of a predator, I will sue the state of New Jersey and anyone who had anything to do with making this a law.

  2. NRuck

    It seems no one supports this new law that took effect only about a week ago…especially the parents of young drivers. Since I'm from NJ, I wanted to learn about it and came across this insurance agency's blog about it the other day: http://johnhawkagency.com/_blog/Our_Blog/post/, which I found really, really helpful. I suggest reading it!

  3. Darge

    hasn't there already been incidents where young teenage girls (maybe boys) have been targeted? how many people are going to be hurt permanently for the rest of their lives because of a red beacon on their license plate?

    I'm seventeen, how much will my life change if I'm tartgeted? how could a police officer possibly convince my parents that red decals are still a good idea after talking to me in a hospital to get my statement (if god forbid that were ever to happen)?

    These little stickers have the power to destroy my, and other teenagers futures. It is completely ridiculous that thousands of teens are being put at risk so law enforcement can better identify and 'profile' for the sake of more profit by tickets.

    The idea is fantastic, but in reality it just isn't feasible, some ideas are supposed to stay ideas. Doing this to protect us is noble, however the danger it creates makes the effort worthless.

    Please keep me and my friends safe, repeal this. Now.

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